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Time to get out your cans of V05, the Max Factor mascara, and tune into See Hear Podcast.

For episode 35, Bernard, Tim and Maurice discussed 2001’s “Rock Star” starring Marky-Mark Wahlberg (and his metal bunch) and Jennifer Anniston. Set in the eighties (of course), Wahlberg stars as a singer in a hair metal tribute band, and then finds himself becoming the lead singer of the real band he’s paying tribute to. He’s living the dream……or is he??????

The crew discuss the Hollywood definition of danger, American film maker’s perceptions of the English, the film’s attempt at subtext, machismo with lipstick, where this film compares to other movies about bands, is hair metal real metal, and of course…..following your dreeeeeaaaammmmm. We wonder if John Waters had not already done so, should this film have been called Hairspray?

As per usual, the crew had a blast raising our hands and banging our heads. Put away your Ratt records for an hour, and give the show a listen.

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

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It's October....and approaching Halloween, Tim, Bernard and Maurice decide to get thematically appropriate. We've picked a horror musical rather than a music-centric story.

Yes, indeed we bring you a tale about a boy, a girl, a sadist, a masochist, and an all-singing-all-carnivorous venus fly trap-like plant called Audrey II. We bring you the See Hear discussion on Frank Oz' 1986 filmed version of the stage musical, Little Shop of Horrors, itself based on the 1960 Roger Corman b-movie flick THE Little Shop of Horrors.

Seymour works in Mushnick's flower shop in Skid Row wishing for a better life and is secretly in love with his shop assistant Audrey. 
Audrey is dating Orin Scrovello a sadistic dentist but fantasises about a life out of a Home Beautiful magazine with Seymour.
Audrey II wants food.....NOW!!!! It also has a more sinister long term plan...
Who will win in the battle between Seymour and "the vegetable"? 
Will Arthur Denton get a long.....slow.....root....canal?
Will Ronnette, Crystal and Chiffon work for Phil Spector?
Will Jack Nicholson just come right out and admit that his finest acting moment was in the Roger Corman original?

The See Hear crew had a fantastic time discussing the history behind the making of this film (we reveal who was originally supposed to direct and star in it), the original 5 million dollar ending that had to be scrapped (and our preference for director's cut vs theatrical cut), horticulture, girl groups, horror comedy, the songs of Howard Ashman and Alan Menken,and just generally why we love this film.

If you dig what we do,could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do,or anything else music-film related.
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Welcome to episode 33 of See Hear. 

 

A country girl hits her head and ends up in a dream in the Land of Oz She is gifted a pair of red shoes by the good fairy and goes off on a journey to see The Wizard accompanied by three friends – one with no brain, one with no heart, and one with no courage. Sounds familiar? Welcome to 1976’s “Oz: A Rock and Roll Road Movie”aka “20th Century Oz” for American release.

 

In 1976, Australian music film clip pioneer Chris Lofven adapted the Wizard of Oz to a (then) contemporary setting in rural Victoria and Melbourne. In recent years, the term “Ozploitaion” has been appropriated to define certain films of this period, and it seems that Oz has been overlooked. See Hear wish to bring it back to public awareness.

 

Bernie, Tim and Maurice welcome MikeWhite of The Projection Booth back to the show to discuss whether theadaptation was successful, the Australian film renaissance of the Seventies, andthe great Australia versus America debate on whether to compact a word with “ie”or “er”(listen to the show - it will make sense). Mike was also kind enough toallow us to include a snippet of a recent interview he did with actor BruceSpence which reveal his recollections on the making of the film.

 

Also, Bernie reveals his love ofBachman-Turner Overdrive.

 

But wait…..there’s more. Maurice had the great fortune to speak with Ian McFarlane, music journalist and the author of theEncyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop”. Ian is a wealth of knowledge about anything to do with Australian rock music through its entire history. They discuss the music of “Oz”, the filming locations, Ross Wilson (the film’s main music contributor), Chris Lofven’s music background and previous short films and much more.

 

See Hear want to thank Mike and Ian for giving so willingly of their time and knowledge to the show.


Special note: All sound problems prevalent in the previous episode have been ironed out.

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/ 

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to make suggestions of films you’d like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do, or anything music film related. 

 

You can (and SHOULD) download the Projection Booth  from iTunes or http://projection-booth.blogspot.com

 

2017 will see the new edition of Ian’s Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop”. He is currently a contributor to http://addictedtonoise.com.au

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Welcome to episode 32 of See Hear podcast.

 

Can you imagine Francois Truffaut visiting New York in the seventies, walking into CBGBs, and thinking "I really need to make a film inspired by this new thing called punk"? (except he'd probably be thinking it n French....but apart from that, can you imagine it?) It seems that Ulli Lommel had one of those "what if" moments, and so a man more known for horror films came up with Blank Generation.

 

Blank Generation concerns the tempestuous relationship between a French journalist (Carole Bouquet) and a punk singer (Richard Hell) in NYC during the seventies. Does Godard and punk music mix? Does the film work as a romance? Does it work as a punk film? Does it work as a tribute to the French New Wave? Is it a decent way to spend 78 minutes? Will Nada and Billy ever get to the beach? Would GG Allin have liked it? Bernie, Tim and Maurice will clue you in.

 

But wait....there's more. Four years earlier in 1976, Amos Poe and Ivan Kral put together a film called THE Blank Generation featuring a lot of poorly edited black and white footage of some unknown punk bands like Blondie, Patti Smith Band, Talking Heads and The Ramones playing at CBGBs. The film was shot silent but had the bands' music place on top of the film with no attempt to synchronise the audio and visual (maybe not even doing the same songs). We discuss this time capsule and whether despite its amateurish nature, if it had something to offer.

 

We had a fun time discussing these films and hope you enjoy our chat. We only discovered in post production there were some audio issues, but hopefully, you should still enjoy the content.

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/ 

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to make suggestions of films you’d like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do, or anything music film related. 

 

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Welcome to episode 31 of See Hear podcast. 

In a first for the show, Bernie, Tim and Maurice invite a film director on the show to discuss his work. Specifically, the crew is joined by Harry Hayes who has directed a terrific award winning documentary called You Better Take Cover. Back in 1981, Australian band Men At Work released the single Down Under from their debut album Business As Usual. The song became famous around the world and became an unofficial Australian national anthem - it has certainly been used at international sporting events involving an Australian team. 

The story of the song's rise to fame would have been interesting enough for a short film, but the story had an unexpected second act. In 2008, Australian TV music trivia show Spicks And Specks posed an innocent question asking what children's nursery rhyme a flute riff played in the song by Greg Ham was based on -  the answer had sad and ultimately tragic consequences. 

The crew ask Harry about what prompted him to put the documentary together, his investigation into Down Under as a cultural phenomenon and as a legal case. We discuss about the use of quoting riffs from one sing in another - why does the legal fraternity interpret homage as plagiarism? Is their profession equipped to understand the difference? Were the publishers of the nursery rhyme genuinely protecting their "property” or were they just greedy opportunists? 

We thank Harry for his time. Keep a look out for a release of the film very shortly. If you want to keep an eye out for screenings, watch the trailer or find out other information about the film, you can go to http://youbettertakecover.com/

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/ 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to make suggestions of films you’d like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do, or anything music film related. 

 

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It’s time for episode 30 of See Hear Podcast.

This month it was Tim’s pick, and he brought to the table a late night cult classic in Perry Henzel’s 1972 film, “The Harder They Come” starring reggae superstar, Jimmy Cliff.

This film is important in so many respects – it brought Jimmy Cliff to a worldwide audience, it had a brilliant soundtrack, and it was the first Jamaican feature film. Henzel declared he made it for Jamaica, but many people outside Jamaica have embraced it as it encompasses the well used movie theme of fighting back against a corrupt society in all its facets – employers, the recording industry, religion, and the law.

Jimmy Cliff plays Ivan, a young naïve country man coming to Kingston hoping to make it in the music industry, but has his dreams crushed at every turn – until he decides to take matters into his own hands, for better or worse. Make no mistake - he is an anti-hero with many failings of his own.

Tim, Bernie and Maurice discuss these themes as well the influence it has left on so many other films, music as politics, where the movie fits into the mood of film movement of the day, and whether you can really hold off an entire army with one six-shooter. Tim even suggests a unique ratings system for this movie.

Please join us for what was a really fun show to record. Shame I couldn’t get the guys to join me singing a verse acapella of The Harder They Come.

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/ 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to make suggestions of films you’d like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do, or anything music film related. 

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Welcome to episode 29 of See Hear Podcast.

Our beloved Bernard was suffering the effects of the summer flu and was too croaky and sneezy to partake, but Tim and Maurice soldiered on joined by Robert Hubbard to discuss a rock opera from 1974 called Catch My Soul.

Not for the first time is the story of Othello discussed on the podcast. Catch My Soul debuted as a stage show in Los Angeles, before finding life on the stage in England. The setting of the story and the songs evolved reflecting real-world events. In 1974, the popularity of the rock opera allowed Catch My Soul to be financed for film without too much issue….and then sank without trace. Producer Jack Good supposedly tampered with the film after Patrick McGoohan had approved a final cut following a life revelation. To say there is a lot of interesting history associated with this film would be mild.

Tim, Robert and Maurice discuss the origins of the show, its original cast members, its transfer to (and quick disappearance from) the big screen, and the rediscovery of a print in the back of a semi-trailer on a farm in Carolina.

The film was trashed in its day. Is it possible that a film with Tony Joe White, Richie Havens and Susan Tyrell could be a bomb, or is it a masterpiece that 1974 film critics didn’t understand? We at See Hear HQ like to think we have the final word on this film….until someone else puts forth an opinion. Tune in and find out.The film is now available through Etiquette Pictures.

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download fromhttp://seehear.podbean.com/

 Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

 You can read Robert’s writings about film at http://366weirdmovies.com/ (under thename 'El Rob Hubbard') and at http://mimezine.blogspot.com/

You can also hear him on Episode 248 of The Projection Booth with Mike White discussing the film Phase IV. Download from http://projection-booth.blogspot.com.au/2015/12/episode-248-phase-iv.html

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Welcome to episode 28 of See Hear Podcast.

It's Bernie's selection this month, and he's gone for a film based on a song. It's the Arthur Penn-directed "Alice's Restaurant" based on the song of the same name by Arlo Guthrie.

 

The original song / monologue was a funny (allegedly true) tale about how Arlo gets arrested for dumping garbage away from the city dump and then gets rejected from being drafted to fight in the Vietnam war.  He's not moral enough to kill people because of his "criminal record" as a litterbug.

 

The film tells this tale, but (by necessity) fleshes out the story into an episodic series of events concerning Arlo, his friends Ray and Alice, the hippies they become surrogate parents to, and conservative America at war with itself as well as being at war on the world stage.

 

The music connection? Well it is based on a song, but music was a huge part of the counter culture of the period. Arlo is caught up in the values and the music of his predecessors as well as his contemporaries. Hear what Bernie, Tim and Maurice thought.

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download fromhttp://seehear.podbean.com/

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

 

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Episode 27 of See Hear Podcast is ready for your aural consumption.

So Tim, Bernard and Maurice are discussing a film about a band who go on the road and…well…shit happens. Could be any number of films? It’s a mock-documentary. Hmmm….still leaves a couple of choices. Okay, it’s been cited as one of the greatest ever films out of Canada. Okay, now you just have to know that we’re talking about Hard Core Logo.

Bruce McDonald released this gem in 1996 about a punk band that reform to do a benefit gig, then follow up with five gigs through western Canada.  Different ambitions and egos collide, medications go missing, goats get sacrificed, and home truths get told. The film is about friendships, trust, putting on a macho face to cover insecurity, and investigates whether you should be able to have the same ambitions and life at 35 year old, as when you were a 17 year old.

Not without humour, but it is certainly a darker film than the one it’s frequently compared to, “This Is Spinal Tap”. The See Hear crew really enjoyed recording this episode for you. They even make links to some other films you would not obviously think to compare HCL with. What were they? Tune in and find out

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download fromhttp://seehear.podbean.com/

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

 

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Back in February, Bernie and Maurice were joined by Frank Santopadre and Tish Grier to discuss Bill Pohlad's 2015 biopic on Brian Wilson, Love And Mercy for episode 25 of See Hear.

In April, Maurice interviewed Darian Sahanaja (Wondermints and Brian Wilson Band) for Love That Album episode 89 on the final day of Brian's 2016 tour of Australia. The last part of the interview featured a discussion about Darian's work as musical consultant on Love And Mercy.With Tim and Bernie's blessing, Maurice thought it would be a good idea to present this segment as a bonus episode of See Hear. 

Darian coached the brilliant Paul Dano to play piano in a style similar to Brian, and came up with the idea to use real musicians rather than actors to play The Wrecking Crew as they recorded Pet Sounds. Listen to Darian discuss the creative process  in his work on the film.

If this short discussion has you interested to hear more, look out for episode 89 of Love That Album podcast to hear a whole lot more about Darian and his activities.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

Enjoy the show? Please consider giving us a write up at iTunes or recommend us to your friends.

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