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Hi, how are you? See Hear episode 51 is available for your earholes.

 

 

Bernard was unavailable to join us, but Tim and I were really thrilled to have fantastic film blogger Kerry Fristoe join us to discuss Jeff Feurzeig’s 2006 documentary, The Devil and Daniel Johnston.

 

 

Daniel Johnston’s story has so many facets to it. Prolific songwriter, artist, musician, DIY promoter of his work…..sufferer of bipolar disorder and manic depression, obsession with an unobtainable muse, deep religious convictions who feared Satan was after him. On top of that, he faced the pressure of someone in the spotlight after celebrity endorsement – a frightening prospect for anyone, never mind a fragile character like Daniel.

 

 

The film somehow manages to provide a well-rounded picture in under two hours about who Johnston is. It doesn’t paint him as a saint, nor is it emotionally manipulative. He could be honest and endearing, but he was capable of selfish and frightening acts as well. Jeff Feurzeig gives us an objective account like a true investigative journalist would about a man devoted to his art who struggled with his mental health – a well rounded account of both aspects and more is provided in this film.

 

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

 

We are hugely grateful to Kerry for being so giving of her time and thoughts on the film. You can read her excellent writings on film at https://prowlerneedsajump.wordpress.com/. She also contributes articles at http://www.brattleblog.brattlefilm.org/ and is part of the fun at http://bmoviemaniacs.com/

 

  

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

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It’s 1991. The Western world has been going through a 1960s music nostalgia revival over the previous decade and a very strong Doors revival in particular. It seemed like a good time for Oliver Stone to make a biopic about Jim Morrison.

 

 

Welcome to episode 50 of See Hear podcast. We celebrate this small milestone (which took us a little over 4 years to get to) by talking about both Oliver Stone’s film and the band that it is based on.

 

 

We discuss narcissism, historical accuracy versus dramatic license, bad poetry, Ed Sullivan, the perfect storm that was the musical stylings of Densmore, Kreiger and Manzarek, and the similarity between something Jim Morrison allegedly did in Florida with something GG Allin definitely did….discussed waaaaaayyyyy back in episode 1 of See Hear.

 

 

On the occasion of our 50th episode, we do about 10 seconds of reflection. If you’ve been listening to the show right from the beginning, thank you….we love you madly (see what I did there????) If you’re recently on board, welcome and please check out the archives.

 

 

When the show is over….turn out the light….turn out the light.

 

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

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There are two sides to every story. We at See Hear HQ decide to look at both sides of the contentious question as to whether record collectors (and by extension, collectors of any physical item) are archivists or hoarders.

 

Tim, Bernard and Maurice are joined by Professor Michael Benton from Bluegrass Community College in Lexington, Kentucky for episode 49 of See Hear to talk about two films that explore record collection from two very different angles.

 

Australian film maker Edward Gillan’s documentary from 2003, “Desperate Man Blues” is a snapshot of the record collecting activities of Joe Bussard from Maryland. Bussard has been collecting old country, blues and jazz 78s from the 1920s through to the 1950s. At the time of filming, he had anything from 15000 to 20000 records. His knowledge of what we currently call Americana is unsurpassed. He has a genuine joy in listening to and sharing the music he has spent a lifetime collecting.

 

On the other side of the coin, Toronto documentarian Alan Zweig’s first feature length film, Vinyl puts himself and many other record collectors under the spotlight to ask what prompts them to “accumulate” records. Zweig’s contention is that the music takes a backseat to the gathering of records – all for the sake of the hunt. He tells many of his interview subjects that they (including himself) cannot form meaningful relationships with others, and so record collecting manifests itself as a substitute for human interaction. Far from flattering. Is this film just cheap therapy for Zweig or is he just playing devil’s advocate to get discussion going?

 

The crew discuss the different approach taken to the subject matter between the films, as well as how close to home these films (Vinyl in particular) may have hit. You may collect DVDs, model aeroplanes, matchboxes…….the ideals of historical preservation vs accumulation for its own sake still hold. Should we judge? Tune in for what we believe to be a fascinating and robust discussion.

 

The crew wants to thank Michael for joining us for his first See Hear episode – it will not be his last. He was a fantastic guest.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

If you want to follow Michael’s writings and activities, you can read his blog Dialogic Cinephilia at http://internationalfilmstudies.blogspot.com. You can also join look for the Bluegrass Film Society group on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/133248476719239/

 

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See Hear is ready to start the new year with a musical sci-fi road film….but nothing like Hope / Crosby / Lamour films.

 

Bernard, Tim and Maurice are once again joined by Mike White of The Projection Booth to talk about Cory Mcabee’s feature film debut from 2001, The American Astronaut. It’s all too easy to describe this film as a mashup of styles (usually starting with “David Lynch meets….”). The truth is Cory Mcabee has come up with something unique while acknowledging films he obviously loves. The narrative covers Sam Curtis – delivery man for hire who has to make a series of trades before he can collect a reward. All the while he has a nemesis chasing him around the universe waiting to forgive him…so he can kill him….. and people burst into song. Sounds straightforward? It ain’t, and yet it is. The story is very accessible, but the devil is in the details.

 

The crew had a fun time with this film and we thank Mike requesting it be covered and joining us to discuss it.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

If you’ve not listened to The Projection Booth yet….WHY NOT???? Rectify this immediately by going through the archives at projection-booth.blogspot.com Mike is the James Brown of the podcast world.

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

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See Hear Podcast comes to the end of its fourth year of existence. Slowly but surely, we’ve been bringing you discussions about all manner of music-related films since January 2014.

 

To celebrate, Tim, Bernard and Maurice want to party like its 1986. We are joined by one of the two creators of the film / time capsule known as Heavy Metal Parking Lot, Jeff Krulik. Jeff and John Heyn hung out for 2 hours in the parking lot of the Capital Centre in Landover, Maryland on May 31 1986 just prior to a Judas Priest concert. They went armed with a camera, a microphone, four U-matic tapes, and the bravado to ask the teens / early twenty-somethings about their love for heavy metal music. The result honestly captures the joy these fans had at celebrating a particular time in their life. The film doesn’t romanticise their youth, nor mock it – it is simply a record of a night. There are truths that can be applied to any community worldwide.

 

Jeff and John went on to make further short films of a similar nature investigating fans of different aspects of popular culture (like Phish, monster trucks, Neil Diamond, Harry Potter), but HMPL is where it all started. The See Hear crew are grateful that Jeff gave so willingly of his time to talk about this important film. It slowly gained many fans over the years, many of them musicians – which shows us that they too are fans.

 

To all See Hear listeners, thanks so much for sticking with us for another year. We’re all hugely grateful, and look forward to bringing you great shows for your earholes in 2018.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

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Do you like wearing leather overalls?

Do you know what it means to be young tonight?

Have you ever blown up a motorcycle by shooting a cap gun at it?

Are you a one man stud?

Have you ever been in a sledgehammer fight?

If you answered yes, no, maybe or “outta my way, stupid” to these questions, then See Hear episode 46 is for YOU.

Tim, Maurice, Bernard welcome the hugely enthusiastic Lily Sockmonkey (although she’s Janine to her non-film friends) to her podcasting debut to talk about Walter Hill’s 1984 film, Streets of Fire.

Ellen Aim is a rockstar kidnapped mid-concert by a biker gang in a (might as well be) lawless era that is caught in a time warp between the 1950s and the 1980s. Her ex-boyfriend is joined by a soldier of fortune and Ellen’s current wet (Billy) fish boyfriend to rescue her from the clutches of the gang led by a sociopath.

The See Hear crew discuss the acting, film parallels, Walter Hill, two Beatle connections, bombastic musical excess, Flashdance, and The Blasters.

Speaking of The Blasters, the show also features an interview with their ex-saxophone player, Steve Berlin (currently playing for Los Lobos). He chats about his recollections of working on the film set during one crucial scene. Huge thanks to Steve for his time.

Many thanks also to Lily for joining us and getting into the spirit of the conversation for her requested film.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

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Welcome to See Hear 45.

We all love movies and we all love music in movies (it’s partly why you listen to this podcast, right?) Film scores can be bold and bombastic or quiet and subtle. Either way it’s a strong part of the film watching experience.

It seems crazy that until 2017, there hasn’t been a major documentary (that we’re aware of) dedicated to the art of film composition and the people who devote their lives to emotionally manipulating you more than what you actually see on-screen via their music.

Matt Schrader is the director of a great new documentary called “Score: A Film Music Documentary” that looks into the process of film score composition, how it’s evolved, interviews with a number of its current practitioners, and the psychology behind how viewers perceive the on-screen action when music is playing (sex, chocolate and music all produce the same rush in your brain, apparently). Bernard, Tim and Maurice were very excited to have Matt come onto the podcast and discuss making the film and his own love of scores.

We all wished this could be a 10 part HBO series, but Matt packs a lot into its 90 minute running time. We at See Hear HQ highly recommend it and thank Matt for giving us his time.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

Keep an eye out for theatre screenings, get resource material or order the DVD / Blu Ray from https://www.score-movie.com/. You can also get the film from iTunes.

If you want to follow Matt on Twitter you can do so @mattschrader or you can like the Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ScoreMovie/

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

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Hello everybody…….See Hear episode 44 here…..

Every music scene has its local heroes….those musicians who are a well-kept secret from the rest of the world, but gig goers wish more people knew about them. Melbourne film-maker Chris Franklin has made it his mission to document musicians in his local scene. Bernard was absent, but Tim and Maurice invited Chris to talk about his latest short film in adherence to that mission, “Chris Wilson – Live At The Continental”. 

Melbourne musicians Chris Wilson and Shane O’Mara along with pianist Jex Saarelaht released a beloved album in 1994 called “Live At The Continental”. (The Continental Café’ was a favourite haunt for the best local and international songwriters and musicians). Franklin shows Chris and Shane recalling the circumstances behind that album, but ended up putting together something more broad and substantial. Even if you don’t know who they are, their commonality to any musician is the great art that is created when honesty, humour and trust overrides commercial success for its own sake. Every city around the world that celebrates its local musicians has its own Chris and Shane.

Tim and Maurice were extremely grateful to have Chris Franklin take the time to talk about this wonderful short film, and hope you find the conversation enjoyable.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 If you live in Melbourne and listen to the show before the end of September 2017, you can see the film as a support feature to the documentary The Go-Betweens: Right Here.  Check the following website for session times.

http://www.cinemanova.com.au/films/go-betweens-the-right-here

 

 

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We Are The Best! We Are The Best!

No it's not the See Hear theme song. It's the name of this month's film under discussion.

Can you imagine two grown men talking about a film on which the plot revolves around three teenage girls forming a punk band and only one of them has any musical chops? Imagine no further because Maurice is joined by Hank Hellman to do just that. The notions of friendship, being an outsider, sticking it to parents (not always deservedly) and chocolate ice cream are all universal themes, so the gents qualify to discuss Lukas Moodyson's 2013 film based on a graphic novel by his wife Coco.

The film is funny, honest, scattered, and most importantly realistic. This is not a Steven Spielberg tale of growing up and "learning something" in the dying moments. It's about 3 friends having fun, getting jealous, not always doing the right thing by each other, and standing up for themselves in small ordinary ways....you know....real life!!!!

Bernie and Tim were not available since they were practising in their Stiff Little Fingers tribute band. They will return next month to much applause. The crew want to thank Hank for once again coming onto the show and bringing the film discussion thunder. Our door is always open to you, Hank.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

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Time to put your cup of tea to one side, pull up your trousers and return to the wonderful era in an alternate universe when Rutlemania ruled.

The film selection for See Hear episode 42 was requested by Barry Knobel, “The Rutles: All You Need Is Cash” released in 1978. The film is (very probably) the first ever mockumentary about the Pre-Fab Four. Monty Python member Eric Idle along with ex Bonzo Dog member Neil Innes devised a TV show sketch featuring a band from another dimension where the more famous Liverpudlians don’t exist. Gary Weis of Saturday Night Live offered Idle the opportunity to give the characters a fully blown film. Wisely, it was made to look like a documentary rather than a narrative piece.

Tim, Bernard and Maurice are joined by Rutle fan (and story editor for another of our favourite films, Good Vibrations) Colin McKeown. We discuss the art of parody on one band vs parody of a musical culture, American vs British comedy, Pythons, SNL, attention to detail, song parody, and the disgrace that is tea consumption.

We are hugely grateful that Colin took the time to join us. He’s hugely passionate about music and films, so he’s good folks in our books. He also tells us what he’s done in film and what his next very exciting film project is……one that will definitely be of interest to See Hear listeners. We hope this is the first of many appearances on See Hear for Colin.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

 

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