Feed on
Posts

In 1964, President Lyndon Johnson had pushed for the passing of the Civil Rights act, making segregation in America illegal. The governor of Mississippi, the law and the KKK vowed to keep doing things their way, and continued to perpetrate violence on the local African-American population. They also made life extremely difficult for students from the northern states committed to the Summer Project which was devoted to getting African Americans in Mississippi to register to vote. The powers that be in Mississippi didn't like "outsiders" interfering in their business. Three students, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner were all murdered by the local law representatives.

 

Quite separate from these tragic events, three young blues fans from the east coast and three from the west coast went searching in Mississippi for their blues heroes Son House and Skip James who had not been heard from for many years. They were naive about the events of the Civil Rights movement and their own danger. Their hopes were to learn from their heroes and coax them out of musical retirement. 

 

The stories are part of a 2016 documentary called Two Trains Runnin’. It’s directed by Sam Pollard and produced / written by Benjamin Hedin. Both men have a long history in film and book relating to the period covered in this documentary.  For episode 57 of See Hear Podcast, Bernard, Tim and Maurice were thrilled to have Benjamin come onto the show to discuss the film and the history behind it. These stories are parallel but converge. There are moments of terror trying to fathom man's inhumanity to man, and there are moments of celebration when the love of music brings people together. The film is rivetting viewing. Make this episode a priority – it’s an important one. We are hugely grateful for his time.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com.

 

You can purchase or rent the film at https://itunes.apple.com/us/movie/two-trains-runnin/id1412361651 (and we highly recommend that you do).

 

See Hear Podcast is also now available on Spotify. https://open.spotify.com/show/58DUosxlE6vZHqgRdjKqZR

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at your next barbecue, gig, or marathon run so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook group at  http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

00:0000:00

The history of cinema is littered with films that have nostalgia for a simpler time in the writer or director’s life. Often they’re done with quite a bit of distance which creates a sense of wistfulness.

 

Then there’s Dogs In Space.

 

Welcome to Episode 56 of See Hear Podcast.

 

This month our beloved Tim was relocating to Toronto after many years in Seoul, so he took the month off from gasbagging about movies while settling in. Bernard and I settle in the second of our requests for the year. Michael Benton, film studies lectuter at Kentucky College requested we tackle the 1986 film from Richard Lowenstein Dogs In Space based on Lowensein's recolletions of the wild and fun times living in a share household in the inner suburb of Richmond in Melbourne. The house is populated with punks, hippies, a lothario quoting socialism, and the worst sounding punk band around.

The film is less of a narrative and more a slice of life. Unlike other films devoted to nostalgia (like American Graffitti), Dogs is set in the very recent past from the time Lowenstein filmed it. He was able to freshly recount the exciting times he'd had, while looking at the very point where the fun stopped and the parties ended. The film came under fire for focusing more on the fun and hedonism of his youth and less on the tragedy of heroin use. RL said it was his youth to document s he saw fit....and the heroin use is not painted lightly.

 

Bernard and myself discuss the punk scene of the day, Melbourne punk venues, Nick Cave, Michael Hutchence, rocker versus art school rivalries, and lambs as pets. We hope you enjoy the discussion.

 

NOTE: I realised later on that every time I mention the name Sam Sejavka (the real life singer of The Ears, who Michael Hutchence's character is based on), I say "Sevajka". My apologies for my tardiness. Please don't start a flame war on this.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at your next barbecue, gig, or marathon run so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook group at  http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

00:0000:00

 

 

Many of us have an ambition to grow older with our sanity intact....doing it gracefully is often the antithesis of what's expected of a rock musician.

 

For See Hear podcast episode 55, Bernie, Tim and Maurice invited Michael Grodner onto the show for a conversation. Michael is the director of 2017 film, The Icarus Line Must Die. The story focuses around real life musician Joe Cardamone. He was the lead singer and creative force behind LA post-punk band, The Icarus Line. Joe is now at the “ripe old age” of 37. He is still unsuccessfully trying to get labels to listen to his band, but he's also dealing with a very supportive yet concerned fiance' who needs him to earn some money for them to put food on the table, band members quitting, spoiled rich kids wasting his studio time, fatally ill friends.....oh, did I mention there's a psychopath sending Joe anonymous death threats? Another exciting day in the life of a rock musician!!!!

 

The See Hear crew speak with Michael about the LA punk scene, working with non-actors, the nature of success, the inspiration of Jim Jarmusch, and laundromats. We're extremely grateful that Michael gave so willingly of his time to speak about his work. We highly recommend you search out The Icarus Line Must Die.

 

You can stream The Icarus Line Must Die on iTunes and Amazon in the US.....watch out for it in other places soon.

 

Huge thanks to Mike White of The Projection Booth for the recommendation and to Karen Oberman for arranging the interview.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at your next barbecue, gig, or marathon run so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook group at  http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

00:0000:00

Films about bands are supposed to follow the arc of forming, start out awful, get better, create personal or artistic friction, achieve success, then implode just as the world can't get enough of them.

 

Then there's Leningrad Cowboys.

 

For See Hear podcast episode 54, Bernie, Tim and Maurice discuss Aki Kaurismaki's 1989 film Leningrad Cowboys Go America about a band from Siberia in the era of glasnost attempting to break into America. They are led through “the promised land” with a clueless manager and followed by their village idiot (who just may be the cousin / brother no one wants to talk about). They play to unreceptive audiences while travelling across America to play at a Mexican wedding, but is that of any importance to them?

 

The crew discuss music as the air we breathe, adapting to one's environment, the ruling class / working class divide, onions, Elvis quiffs, carrying a stiff around, and rrrrrrrock & rrrrrrroll.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

00:0000:00

Get ready to dust your broom and sing the blues. See Hear podcast episode 53 is ready for your aural pleasure, and the focus is one of four films Takashi Miike directed in 1998 (!!!), Blues Harp.

 

The film tells the story of two young men, each with very different goals in life. One is a member of a Yakuza clan who has dreams of heading becoming boss, the other just wants to cruise by life and take pleasure at playing his harmonica. After Chuji helps Kenji out one night, Kenji feels honour bound to protect his new friend from dangers that lie ahead as he gets drawn into a plot of deceipt and backstabbing.

 

When people think Miike, they typically think of his confronting films like Audition, Visitor Q, or Ichi The Killer. Films like The Happiness of the Katakuris, The Bird People in China, Zebraman and Blues Harp show there's a diversity not always discussed. Blues Harp may not be well known, but it is a film of incredible maturity. Miike uses every technique in his storytelling arsenal to build on what is essentially a character study and make his audience care about his chaacters' fates.

 

Tim, Bernie, and Maurice discuss Miike's career, as well as oral hygiene, the lengths some people will go to get to the top, confidence (there's a connection) and Little Walter.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

00:0000:00

Everybody's talkin' about See Hear episode 52....at least we hope so, because One download is the loneliest podcast you'd ever hear.....

Unfortunately, Tim was not available to record, but Maurice and Bernie once again welcome wonderful film blogger Kerry Friistoe to discuss the 2006 documentary from John Scheinfeld "Who Is Harry Nilsson (And Why Is Everybody Talkin' About Him)?"

Nilsson started out as a perfectly groomed writer of songs that blended baroque pop with English music hall. His initial albums came out during a period in America where popular culture was undergoing change - he rebelled by recording old fashioned tunes with both heart and cynicism (no wonder he and Randy Newman got along). He earned the admiration and respect of a multitude of musiciansand the recod buying public.  He evolved to a rock performer via his most famous album, Nilsson Schmilsson. This earned him accolades and afforded him the opportunity to drink, run lines of coke and have regular parties - a long way from his early life in Brooklyn being raised by relatives when his father deserted him and his mother.

This episode of See Hear focuses on our thoughts about the film, Harry's music, and how it evolved. We discuss the friendship between Harry and The Beatles (particularly Ringo and John). The friendships resulted in a poorly regarded horror film called Son Of Dracula (Harry Nilsson plays as Count Downe.....yep you read that right....sigh) and a poorly regarded album. Do they have merit? Download the show and find out.

BUT WAIT...there's more. After the main discussion there's an interview with Anthony Sloman, the editor of Son Of Dracula. He talks about coming up through the British film industry and the amazing films he worked on and people he got to work with (including Ray Harryhausen). What was it like working on Son Of Dracula with Harry Nilsson? Anthony was fascinating to talk with and we hope you enjoy this special addition to the show. My huge thanks to his son, Jonathan Sloman who set the interview up.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

We are hugely grateful once again to Kerry for joining us. She will be back. You can read her excellent writings on film at https://prowlerneedsajump.wordpress.com/. She also contributes articles at http://www.brattleblog.brattlefilm.org/ and is part of the fun at http://bmoviemaniacs.com/

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

00:0000:00

Hi, how are you? See Hear episode 51 is available for your earholes.

 

 

Bernard was unavailable to join us, but Tim and I were really thrilled to have fantastic film blogger Kerry Fristoe join us to discuss Jeff Feurzeig’s 2006 documentary, The Devil and Daniel Johnston.

 

 

Daniel Johnston’s story has so many facets to it. Prolific songwriter, artist, musician, DIY promoter of his work…..sufferer of bipolar disorder and manic depression, obsession with an unobtainable muse, deep religious convictions who feared Satan was after him. On top of that, he faced the pressure of someone in the spotlight after celebrity endorsement – a frightening prospect for anyone, never mind a fragile character like Daniel.

 

 

The film somehow manages to provide a well-rounded picture in under two hours about who Johnston is. It doesn’t paint him as a saint, nor is it emotionally manipulative. He could be honest and endearing, but he was capable of selfish and frightening acts as well. Jeff Feurzeig gives us an objective account like a true investigative journalist would about a man devoted to his art who struggled with his mental health – a well rounded account of both aspects and more is provided in this film.

 

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

 

We are hugely grateful to Kerry for being so giving of her time and thoughts on the film. You can read her excellent writings on film at https://prowlerneedsajump.wordpress.com/. She also contributes articles at http://www.brattleblog.brattlefilm.org/ and is part of the fun at http://bmoviemaniacs.com/

 

  

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

00:0000:00

It’s 1991. The Western world has been going through a 1960s music nostalgia revival over the previous decade and a very strong Doors revival in particular. It seemed like a good time for Oliver Stone to make a biopic about Jim Morrison.

 

 

Welcome to episode 50 of See Hear podcast. We celebrate this small milestone (which took us a little over 4 years to get to) by talking about both Oliver Stone’s film and the band that it is based on.

 

 

We discuss narcissism, historical accuracy versus dramatic license, bad poetry, Ed Sullivan, the perfect storm that was the musical stylings of Densmore, Kreiger and Manzarek, and the similarity between something Jim Morrison allegedly did in Florida with something GG Allin definitely did….discussed waaaaaayyyyy back in episode 1 of See Hear.

 

 

On the occasion of our 50th episode, we do about 10 seconds of reflection. If you’ve been listening to the show right from the beginning, thank you….we love you madly (see what I did there????) If you’re recently on board, welcome and please check out the archives.

 

 

When the show is over….turn out the light….turn out the light.

 

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

00:0000:00

There are two sides to every story. We at See Hear HQ decide to look at both sides of the contentious question as to whether record collectors (and by extension, collectors of any physical item) are archivists or hoarders.

 

Tim, Bernard and Maurice are joined by Professor Michael Benton from Bluegrass Community College in Lexington, Kentucky for episode 49 of See Hear to talk about two films that explore record collection from two very different angles.

 

Australian film maker Edward Gillan’s documentary from 2003, “Desperate Man Blues” is a snapshot of the record collecting activities of Joe Bussard from Maryland. Bussard has been collecting old country, blues and jazz 78s from the 1920s through to the 1950s. At the time of filming, he had anything from 15000 to 20000 records. His knowledge of what we currently call Americana is unsurpassed. He has a genuine joy in listening to and sharing the music he has spent a lifetime collecting.

 

On the other side of the coin, Toronto documentarian Alan Zweig’s first feature length film, Vinyl puts himself and many other record collectors under the spotlight to ask what prompts them to “accumulate” records. Zweig’s contention is that the music takes a backseat to the gathering of records – all for the sake of the hunt. He tells many of his interview subjects that they (including himself) cannot form meaningful relationships with others, and so record collecting manifests itself as a substitute for human interaction. Far from flattering. Is this film just cheap therapy for Zweig or is he just playing devil’s advocate to get discussion going?

 

The crew discuss the different approach taken to the subject matter between the films, as well as how close to home these films (Vinyl in particular) may have hit. You may collect DVDs, model aeroplanes, matchboxes…….the ideals of historical preservation vs accumulation for its own sake still hold. Should we judge? Tune in for what we believe to be a fascinating and robust discussion.

 

The crew wants to thank Michael for joining us for his first See Hear episode – it will not be his last. He was a fantastic guest.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

If you want to follow Michael’s writings and activities, you can read his blog Dialogic Cinephilia at http://internationalfilmstudies.blogspot.com. You can also join look for the Bluegrass Film Society group on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/133248476719239/

 

00:0000:00

See Hear is ready to start the new year with a musical sci-fi road film….but nothing like Hope / Crosby / Lamour films.

 

Bernard, Tim and Maurice are once again joined by Mike White of The Projection Booth to talk about Cory Mcabee’s feature film debut from 2001, The American Astronaut. It’s all too easy to describe this film as a mashup of styles (usually starting with “David Lynch meets….”). The truth is Cory Mcabee has come up with something unique while acknowledging films he obviously loves. The narrative covers Sam Curtis – delivery man for hire who has to make a series of trades before he can collect a reward. All the while he has a nemesis chasing him around the universe waiting to forgive him…so he can kill him….. and people burst into song. Sounds straightforward? It ain’t, and yet it is. The story is very accessible, but the devil is in the details.

 

The crew had a fun time with this film and we thank Mike requesting it be covered and joining us to discuss it.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from https://seehear.podbean.com

 

If you’ve not listened to The Projection Booth yet….WHY NOT???? Rectify this immediately by going through the archives at projection-booth.blogspot.com Mike is the James Brown of the podcast world.

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists on social media or at real life social gatherings so more folks can tune in.

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to suggest films you'd like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do or anything else music-film related.

 

00:0000:00

- Older Posts »