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It’s time for episode 30 of See Hear Podcast.

This month it was Tim’s pick, and he brought to the table a late night cult classic in Perry Henzel’s 1972 film, “The Harder They Come” starring reggae superstar, Jimmy Cliff.

This film is important in so many respects – it brought Jimmy Cliff to a worldwide audience, it had a brilliant soundtrack, and it was the first Jamaican feature film. Henzel declared he made it for Jamaica, but many people outside Jamaica have embraced it as it encompasses the well used movie theme of fighting back against a corrupt society in all its facets – employers, the recording industry, religion, and the law.

Jimmy Cliff plays Ivan, a young naïve country man coming to Kingston hoping to make it in the music industry, but has his dreams crushed at every turn – until he decides to take matters into his own hands, for better or worse. Make no mistake - he is an anti-hero with many failings of his own.

Tim, Bernie and Maurice discuss these themes as well the influence it has left on so many other films, music as politics, where the movie fits into the mood of film movement of the day, and whether you can really hold off an entire army with one six-shooter. Tim even suggests a unique ratings system for this movie.

Please join us for what was a really fun show to record. Shame I couldn’t get the guys to join me singing a verse acapella of The Harder They Come.

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/ 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com to make suggestions of films you’d like us to discuss, give us your thoughts on what we do, or anything music film related. 

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Welcome to episode 29 of See Hear Podcast.

Our beloved Bernard was suffering the effects of the summer flu and was too croaky and sneezy to partake, but Tim and Maurice soldiered on joined by Robert Hubbard to discuss a rock opera from 1974 called Catch My Soul.

Not for the first time is the story of Othello discussed on the podcast. Catch My Soul debuted as a stage show in Los Angeles, before finding life on the stage in England. The setting of the story and the songs evolved reflecting real-world events. In 1974, the popularity of the rock opera allowed Catch My Soul to be financed for film without too much issue….and then sank without trace. Producer Jack Good supposedly tampered with the film after Patrick McGoohan had approved a final cut following a life revelation. To say there is a lot of interesting history associated with this film would be mild.

Tim, Robert and Maurice discuss the origins of the show, its original cast members, its transfer to (and quick disappearance from) the big screen, and the rediscovery of a print in the back of a semi-trailer on a farm in Carolina.

The film was trashed in its day. Is it possible that a film with Tony Joe White, Richie Havens and Susan Tyrell could be a bomb, or is it a masterpiece that 1974 film critics didn’t understand? We at See Hear HQ like to think we have the final word on this film….until someone else puts forth an opinion. Tune in and find out.The film is now available through Etiquette Pictures.

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download fromhttp://seehear.podbean.com/

 Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

 You can read Robert’s writings about film at http://366weirdmovies.com/ (under thename 'El Rob Hubbard') and at http://mimezine.blogspot.com/

You can also hear him on Episode 248 of The Projection Booth with Mike White discussing the film Phase IV. Download from http://projection-booth.blogspot.com.au/2015/12/episode-248-phase-iv.html

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Welcome to episode 28 of See Hear Podcast.

It's Bernie's selection this month, and he's gone for a film based on a song. It's the Arthur Penn-directed "Alice's Restaurant" based on the song of the same name by Arlo Guthrie.

 

The original song / monologue was a funny (allegedly true) tale about how Arlo gets arrested for dumping garbage away from the city dump and then gets rejected from being drafted to fight in the Vietnam war.  He's not moral enough to kill people because of his "criminal record" as a litterbug.

 

The film tells this tale, but (by necessity) fleshes out the story into an episodic series of events concerning Arlo, his friends Ray and Alice, the hippies they become surrogate parents to, and conservative America at war with itself as well as being at war on the world stage.

 

The music connection? Well it is based on a song, but music was a huge part of the counter culture of the period. Arlo is caught up in the values and the music of his predecessors as well as his contemporaries. Hear what Bernie, Tim and Maurice thought.

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download fromhttp://seehear.podbean.com/

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

 

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

 

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Episode 27 of See Hear Podcast is ready for your aural consumption.

So Tim, Bernard and Maurice are discussing a film about a band who go on the road and…well…shit happens. Could be any number of films? It’s a mock-documentary. Hmmm….still leaves a couple of choices. Okay, it’s been cited as one of the greatest ever films out of Canada. Okay, now you just have to know that we’re talking about Hard Core Logo.

Bruce McDonald released this gem in 1996 about a punk band that reform to do a benefit gig, then follow up with five gigs through western Canada.  Different ambitions and egos collide, medications go missing, goats get sacrificed, and home truths get told. The film is about friendships, trust, putting on a macho face to cover insecurity, and investigates whether you should be able to have the same ambitions and life at 35 year old, as when you were a 17 year old.

Not without humour, but it is certainly a darker film than the one it’s frequently compared to, “This Is Spinal Tap”. The See Hear crew really enjoyed recording this episode for you. They even make links to some other films you would not obviously think to compare HCL with. What were they? Tune in and find out

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download fromhttp://seehear.podbean.com/

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

 

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Back in February, Bernie and Maurice were joined by Frank Santopadre and Tish Grier to discuss Bill Pohlad's 2015 biopic on Brian Wilson, Love And Mercy for episode 25 of See Hear.

In April, Maurice interviewed Darian Sahanaja (Wondermints and Brian Wilson Band) for Love That Album episode 89 on the final day of Brian's 2016 tour of Australia. The last part of the interview featured a discussion about Darian's work as musical consultant on Love And Mercy.With Tim and Bernie's blessing, Maurice thought it would be a good idea to present this segment as a bonus episode of See Hear. 

Darian coached the brilliant Paul Dano to play piano in a style similar to Brian, and came up with the idea to use real musicians rather than actors to play The Wrecking Crew as they recorded Pet Sounds. Listen to Darian discuss the creative process  in his work on the film.

If this short discussion has you interested to hear more, look out for episode 89 of Love That Album podcast to hear a whole lot more about Darian and his activities.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

Enjoy the show? Please consider giving us a write up at iTunes or recommend us to your friends.

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Episode 26 of See Hear is available for your earholes. It’s the final of our 2015 listener requests. The fact that it’s 2016 shows we’re a bit disorganised, but as Bernie suggested, that’s fitting with the subject matter.

Eric Reanimator requested we watch and discuss Color Me Obsessed: A Film About The Replacements, directed by Gorman Bechard and released in 2011. It’s a documentary about the beloved 80s punk / pop band from Minneapolis. It uses the common documentary trope of the “talking head”perspective, but unlike many other documentaries (music or otherwise) this is all it does. There is no Replacements archival footage, nor any interviews with the band. There are producers, peers and fans all giving their stories of gigs witnessed, tutus, trashcans, favourite albums, and teen angst.

Bernard, Tim and Maurice discuss whether this approach to the subject matter actually helps or hinders in appreciating who the Replacements were. There is a lot of digression from talk of the actual film to discussing what we believe the role of a documentary actually is, and what our favourite Replacements albums are. There will be a certain irony about our discussion which will become apparent as we go into the episode – listen and work it out.

You candownload the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

Please joinour friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

You can sendus emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

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It’s time to get out your surfboards, hang onto your ego, and plug in your theremin as See Hear Podcast heads for the beach.

Tim is absent, but Maurice and Bernie are pleased as punch to be joined by two fellow Beach Boys devotees to discuss Bill Pohlad’s 2015 biopic of Brian Wilson, Love And Mercy. For the first part of the show, Frank Santopadre of Gilbert Gottfried’s Amazing Colossal Podcast and writer Tish Grier join the See Hear crew to discuss the Murry Wilson School of parenting, mental health issues, the Wrecking Crew, Beach Boys albums that are not Pet Sounds or Smile, and the contributions to the Beach Boys sounds by members that were not Brian Wilson. The second part of the show is devoted to a discussion on the merits of the film. Given the many flaws usually inherent in a biopic (and we name-check a few), how does Love And Mercy compare? Tune in and find out.

Once again, many thanks to Frank and Tish for giving to the show so generously of their time and knowledge.

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

You can send us emails at seehearpodcast@gmail.com

You can hear Frank trying to keep Gilbert Gottfried grounded by downloading the GGACP at http://www.gilbertpodcast.com/.

You can read Tish’s writings at http://www.the-broad-side.com/ Just do a search for her there.

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See Hear podcast is back for 2016. Did you miss us???? Don’t answer because….telling the truth can be dangerous business.

Tim, Bernard, and Maurice discuss a film hand-picked by the wonderful Frank Santopadre of Gilbert Gottfried’s Amazing Colossal Podcast. That film is 1987’s Ishtar starring Dustin Hoffman and Warren Beatty as Chuck Clarke and Lyle Rogers, two awful songwriters and lounge singers who get sent to play gigs at a hotel in Ishtar, but get caught up in American / Middle Eastern politics. Strangely familiar?

The film was a financial failure with rumours of creative conflict between the director, comedian Elaine May (of the brilliant May and Nichols duo) and Beatty & Hoffman. It has long been derided by the critics and many others as one of the worst films ever made. With bravery and fortitude, the See Hear Crew went in to find out if the film was as bad as reports had made it out. We are pleased to report that there was disagreement among the crew as to the film’s merits – conflict makes a film more interesting, and so it does for members of a podcast. Forget Siskel and Ebert or Stratton and Pomeranz. We give you the infamous Ishtar Disagreement of Merrill, Stickwell and Bursztynski.

Many thanks to Frank for this selection.

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

 

Please join our friendly Facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/seehearpodcast/

 

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Time to get your facepaint on, dig out the platform shoes and fake chest hair, and arm yourself with your love gun…..Yep, the See Hear crew are back to discuss the Hanna-Barbera production, KISS Meets The Phantom of the Park.

 

Bernard, Tim, and Maurice are privileged to be joined by Mike White of the brilliant Projection Booth podcast to talk about the cultural phenomenon that was KISS in the 1970s. What does any self-respecting pop culture icon do? Why, make a quick cash-in film, of course!!!! Is this film in the same league as A Hard Day’s Night? Ummmm……..not exactly….

 

The film is set in an amusement park where KISS are going to perform a series of concerts, but they are at the mercy of a mad scientist (do films have any other kind?) who clones KISS to….ummmm…..take over the amusement park.

 

As well as the film, we talk about KISS as a band, Paul Stanley’s delightful concert banter, and how would they have fared if they’d never put on the makeup and cod-pieces at the start. We find connections to the Marx Brothers, Spinal Tap, and Gilbert Gottfried’s favourite Vincent Price movie (att: Frank Santopadre). Tune in and find out how we weave it all in.

 

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

 

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

 

Our huge thanks to Mike White for suggesting the film and joining us for this episode. If you haven’t checked out The Projection Booth, rectify that  situation IMMEDIATELY. Download episodes from http://projection-booth.com

 

Also, huge thanks go out to Rhys Lett of the local Kiss tribute act Dressed To Chill. As you may deduce from the name, they do acoustic lounge versions of Kiss songs. He has kindly allowed us to play their version of C’mon and Love Me, which we play as the show’s outro. If you need music lessons and live in Melbourne, check out Rhys’ school Eastern Suburbs School of Music at http://www.essm.net.au/

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It’s time for episode 22 of See Hear podcast.

How does music affect you? Are you one of those people who says that great music can transport you to another place? Jazz musician Sun Ra felt the same thing, but he meant it a little more literally than most.

In this episode of the podcast, Tim, Bernie and Maurice discuss important issues such as isotope teleportation, transmolecuralisation, and teleporting people from Earth to Saturn via music. Well….they actually discuss the film released in 1974 written by and starring Sun Ra called “Space Is The Place”. Ra was certainly out there with his beliefs that he was born on Saturn and descended from the Egyptian sun god, Ra. On the other hand, he was extremely articulate, very well read and philosophically rational Oh….and he was a true jazz pioneer.

The film is a mix of the power of music, blaxploitation and science fiction as Sun Ra battles the evil Overseer for the right to transport the Afro-American community from Earth to another planet when he determines the earth is doomed. He will do this via the power of music. Sounds crazy? Yep…..and yet, nope. The See Hear trio see all sorts of film, literature and music precedents for this film, and also point out who took on Sun Ra’s legacy. We hope you find it a thought provoking discussion.

So, if you find earth boring, just the same old same thing, come on jump on board the good space ship See Hear for a trip to the outer recesses of the mind and the universe.

If you dig what we do, could you please rate us at iTunes or even better, spread the word that the show exists so more folks can tune in.

You can download the show by searching for See Hear podcast on iTunes or download from http://seehear.podbean.com/

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